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Computed Tomography (CT)
               
What is CT?  
CT scans, sometimes called CAT scans, is a noninvasive medical test that utilize special x-ray equipment and sophisticated computers to help doctors diagnose and treat medical conditions.  The CT scan produces multiple cross sectional images of the inside of the body that can be interpreted by a doctor that specializes in viewing these types of images. 320 slice CT scanner
These cross sectional images differ from normal x-rays by the fact that they provide greater clarity and more detail.  With the increased clarity and detail the doctor is better able to diagnose any medical conditions that might exist.
Reminders before the exam:
Tell the technologist:
  • if you are allergic to iodine or other materials
  • if you are pregnant
  • if you are claustrophobic and think you will be unable to lie still while inside the CT scanner
  • if you are diabetic, on Glucophage, Glucovance, Glyburide or Metformin
     
How do I prepare for my CT exam?  
Below are some of the exams performed here and their required preparation.  If your exam is not listed or you have further questions please contact us at then please contact us at 719-526-7300 for guidance.
             
HEAD
SINUS
EXTREMITIES
STONE HUNT


No prep required for these exams.
AAA
ABDOMEN RENALS (CTA)   
  W/ CONTRAST
CHEST CTA(PE) W/  
  CONTRAST
CHEST WITH CONTRAST
FACIAL EVANS
HEAD WITH AND 
  WITHOUT CONTRAST
NECK/CHEST
ORBITS WITH CONTRAST
CAROTIDS/COW (CTA)
SOFT TISSUE NECK
  WITH CONTRAST

Report to Radiology 15 minutes prior to your appointment time.
  • Do not eat or drink (except water) two hours prior to your exam.
  • Take all and any medications currently prescribed by your physician.
  • If you are 65 years or older, diabetic, have kidney problems, or have only one kidney, report to the Radiology Department for lab paperwork to have blood work drawn AT LEAST 48 hours before your exam.
  • Inform Radiology if you are allergic to iodine.
CT IVP Report to Radiology 15 minutes prior to your appointment time.
  • Do not eat or drink (except water) two hours prior to your exam.
  • Drink 1 liter of water 30 minutes prior to your exam and have a full bladder
  • If you are 65 years or older, diabetic, have kidney problems, or have only one kidney, report to the Radiology Department for lab paperwork to have blood work drawn AT LEAST 48 hours before your exam.
  • Inform Radiology if you are allergic to iodine.
ABDOMEN WITH AND
  WITHOUT CONTRAST
ABDOMEN WITH
  CONTRAST
ABDOMEN/PELVIS WITH
  AND WITHOUT CONTRAST
ABDOMEN/PELVIS WITH
  CONTRAST
CHEST/ABDOMEN WITH
  CONTRAST
CHEST/ABDOMEN/PELVIS
  WITH AND WITHOUT
  CONTRAST
CHEST/ABDOMEN/PELVIS
  WITH CONTRAST
PELVIS WITH AND WITHOUT
  CONTRAST
PELVIS WITH CONTRAST

Report to Radiology 15 minutes prior to your appointment time.
  • Report to Radiology to pick up your oral contrast media (two bottles) 48 hours before your appointment
  • For morning appointments - nothing to eat or drink, except water, after midnight
    1. Drink the 1st bottle of contrast media at bedtime
    2. Drink the 2nd bottle of contrast media 1 hour before your exam
  • For afternoon appointments - nothing to eat or drink, except water, 4 hours before your appointment
    1. Drink the 1st bottle of contrast media 4 hours before your appointment
    2. Drink the 2nd bottle of contrast media 1 hour before your exam
PANCREAS STUDY Report to Radiology 15 minutes prior to your appointment time.
  • You must drink a total of 32 ounces of whole milk.
    1. Drink 20 ounces 1 hour before your exam
    2. Drink 12 ounces 20 minutes before your exam
  • If you can not tolerate milk then you can substitute it with the same amount of water.
 

This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Department's headquarters organizations, which are the Office of the Army Surgeon General and
U.S. Army Medical Command headquarters. It is intended for interested members of the public, news media and Army Medical Department beneficiaries.
Last Modified 08 August, 2012